December 2018

Last Day of June is a beautiful and short game that tells the story of a couple in a small town. The game is a Third Person adventure game but feels more like a point and click since there’s not really any platforming in it. The art style and music is BEAUTIFUL. Lots of soft vibrant colors that make you feel peaceful when you’re walking around town. And the music fits around the characters you play as.

Oh right the characters! So the only story element you need to know is that the story revolves around a couple, Paul and June. There was a terrible car accident and you play as Paul dealing with the grief of losing his wife. Throughout the game you will see their memories of their lives together up to the present and most importantly, you will get to play as the characters who were around the town during the day of the crash so you can save June.

From the get go you can probably guess what the story is trying to teach you, in fact, the achievements sort of lay it out for you. But I implore you to play it, because there’s actually a really deep meaning that the game surprised me with and by the end I was in tears…like I am right now typing this. I also love learning about the characters around town because their stories are just as important as Paul and June’s. Everyone is hurting in some way and there’s a twisted beauty in picking up the collectibles to learn about their pasts and why they are doing what they are doing around town.

The game was a perfect length of about 3 hours, however I have only one gripe with it. As you play as the different characters, you are trying to cause different scenarios to happen and stop the car crash. This makes long and drawn out cutscenes play that you have to watch multiple times and you CAN’T SKIP THEM. I understand there’s a lesson in frustration, I really do. But there was one part where I couldn’t get a collectible because I had to switch characters and in order to do that you have to go through a lot of cut scenes in order for it to happen and it added a lot of unnecessary wait time.

Despite that one gripe, I still loved this game and loved the message it was trying to get across to the player. Watching lots of people play it on Youtube I can see the ending made everyone cry like myself and that’s how I know the writers and developers did a fantastic job on this game. If you’re looking for a good short story with a powerful and sad message, then I highly recommend you play this game….cherish your loved ones.

TL:DR A beautiful and short Third Person Adventure/Point n Click that explores the sadness of grief in losing a loved one. Very great game but can’t skip cut scenes even when you’ve seen them many times before and you WILL see them many times.

 

November 2018

Are you looking for a relaxing game to get you through the busy holiday season? I recommend Seasons After Fall!

This was a short indie side-scrolling platformer. The graphics have a beautiful hand drawn feel to them so it really makes you feel at peace when playing. The music is also very calming and atmospheric. But let’s dial it back for a moment.

The story is kinda hard to explain. You play as a spirit who’s trying to help another forest spirit known as the Seed. For some reason the forest is oddly vacant and the Guardians of the Seasons are asleep. So your task is to gather the power of the seasons and perform a ritual to fix things.

Since the forest is vacant, there are no enemies or obstacles that really get in your way. Instead, to reach different parts of the stage you have to change the seasons. For example, if you need to climb up a cliff but you see a mushroom cap, you turn it to the autumn season so the mushroom can turn into a platform. Winter freezes the lakes so you can walk across them and so much more.

I found the game to be very charming and perfect for people who are new to video games to play since there are no enemies to fight or get in your way. It’s all about knowing what seasons to use to get around the stages. There was only one part of the game where I found it hard to solve and annoying (the firefly puzzles on the second half of the game UGH). But that part of the game aside,

I once again recommend this game to newcomers and just casual gamers looking for a relaxing platformer to play. See you next review! 

October 2018

So I just finished Hob, from the same studio who brought you the Torchlight series. Here is my in-depth personal review!

I’ve had this game on my wishlist for a long time. Ever since I saw pictures and videos I knew I was going to love it. The art style, gameplay, etc. just sorta called to me. Hob is a game that plays like Zelda but in an isometric view.

The first thing I noticed is how beautiful the art design is. The world has a great blend of machinery and nature together. The story pulled me in too, mainly because it’s entirely up to YOU, the player, to figure it out. Whenever there is any dialogue, you can’t understand it. Why? Because they’re robots silly. However, if you look at the gestures and inflections, you can piece together what the story is trying to convey.

Another thing I loved about Hob is the world-building; it has two meanings in this game (hardy har har). As you progress, not only do you learn more about the world that you’re playing in, but also as you progress, the world starts changing mechanically. New pieces of the map begin to appear and once you do certain objectives, the entire area you’ve previously explored changes and allows you can reach new areas. This is nice because the progression feels more meaningful. You feel like you really make a difference aside from making your character stronger and getting new moves in order to go from point A to point B.

Exploration is so fun in this game as well, and often times you will find great goodies for having a keen eye on a cracked wall or a long jump. However, since the game is in an isometric view, the camera does tend to mess you up sometimes, especially on trickier platforming moments. Isometric computer graphics are graphics employed in video games and pixel art where the viewpoint is angled to reveal facets of the environment that would not be visible from a top-down perspective or sideview, thereby producing a three-dimensional effect. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isometric_computer_graphics)

Luckily there are some good checkpoints scattered about the game so it doesn’t hinder you too much, but just know that going in.

Lastly, the music is very calming and atmospheric. The game has nice spots where you can just sit still and really take in the world that you are playing in. I super enjoyed this game and am happy I played it. I finished it in about 11 hours, but you can finish it in 8 if you’re really good at video games. A perfect length for this adventure and I didn’t even gather all the collectibles. So if you’re looking for a Zelda-like game but with robots, I say pick this game up. You will be pleasantly surprised!

TLDR: A fantastic Zelda-like adventure game, but with robots! Beware though, the game is in an isometric view so some platforming may get frustrating at times.